Best food after hemorrhoid surgery

Find out what you can expect after having hemorrhoid treatment and during your recovery. Pain can be significant if the stool becomes hard or if straining is necessary to have a bowel movement. During the recovery constipation should be avoided whenever possible. The typical patient is able to return to non-strenuous activities a week after treatment, and resume all normal activities within two to three weeks. It is common to experience pain in the week following hemorrhoid treatment. Hemorrhoid banding, an outpatient procedure, typically leads to minimal discomfort after treatments.

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Depending on the type of procedure you choose, your pain may be significant or you may simply feel discomfort. Your doctor may choose to manage your pain in several different ways. Over-the-counter medication, such as ibuprofen, may be recommended, or pain medication may be prescribed. Your physician may recommend a stool softener, a laxative, or both to prevent straining with bowel movements. It is absolutely essential to avoid constipation.

That means following drinking water, eating fiber, and taking a stool softener when necessary. Regardless of the type of treatment, it is normal to have pain with a bowel movement in the week following surgery. Straining and pushing can make the pain significantly worse. Staying hydrated will help prevent constipation, which can be caused by prescription pain medications, a lack of fiber, or too little fluid. Pain with urination may also be present. It is important to let pain be your guide when resuming normal activities. You may feel pain when bending, squatting, lifting or moving from a standing position to a seated position. Minimize activities that are painful as much as possible, especially in the first few days after your procedure. A sitz bath may be prescribed for pain relief.

A sitz bath uses a special basin that is similar to a bedpan and fits over a toilet. You can then soak the rectal area in a few inches of warm water. Itching is a common symptom of external hemorrhoids and may continue during the healing phase after treatment. A sitz bath may be recommended to help with the itching. A topical medication may also be prescribed by your physician, depending on the severity of the symptoms and the location where the hemorrhoid was removed. Itching is a normal sign of healing in a surgical incision or areas of scarring. Many topical hemorrhoid creams are very effective at relieving itching, ask your surgeon if it is appropriate to use these during your recovery as the answer varies between different types of procedures. Infection is a risk after hemorrhoid treatment due to the location of the treatment. Stool can come into contact with the site where the hemorrhoid was removed, and can contribute to an infection.

Some bleeding is not uncommon immediately following your procedure. You may notice some blood in the toilet, or in your undergarments. Bleeding may increase with bowel movements, especially in the initial 48-72 hours following your procedure. Passing blood clots should be reported to your surgeon unless you were told to expect this after surgery. After your surgery, be sure to drink ample fluids, avoid straining with a bowel movement and to eat foods high in fiber even after your recovery. Avoid food you know to be constipating, such as cheese. Exercise, even something as simple as a 15-minute walk can decrease constipation by stimulating a bowel movement, as can twisting motions, such as those done in yoga and toe touches. These simple steps can often prevent a recurrence of hemorrhoids or help you avoid further treatment.

Not all hemorrhoids can be prevented, but following these dietary recommendations can significantly reduce the likelihood of forming additional hemorrhoids. Some patients may experience incontinence of small amounts of stool after having a hemorrhoidectomy, or hemorrhoid surgery. This is typically a short-term problem and resolves within the recovery period. If you experience this complication and it does not improve in the weeks following surgery, be sure to notify your physician. Sign up for our Health Tip of the Day newsletter, and receive daily tips that will help you reach your 2018 goals. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Is Fish Oil the Answer for Heart Disease, Diabetes? For some people, a healthy diet and lifestyle and over-the-counter medicines aren’t enough to treat hemorrhoids.

There are also procedures that shrink or remove them, such as using a laser, that can be done in your doctor’s office. Although these may hurt less and have fewer complications, surgery might be a better long-term choice, especially if your hemorrhoids are large and very painful or bleeding. Hemorrhoid surgery is safe and effective most of the time. But you’ll still need to eat a high-fiber diet, avoid constipation, and take care of your bottom to help prevent new hemorrhoid flare-ups. Talk to your doctor to figure out what’s right for you. Hemorrhoidectomy Surgery to remove hemorrhoids is called hemorrhoidectomy. The doctor makes small cuts around the anus to slice them away.

Hemorrhoidectomy is often an outpatient procedure, and you can usually go home the same day. Because it’s highly sensitive near the cuts and you might need stitches, the area can be tender and painful afterward. Recovery most often takes about 2 weeks, but it can take as long as 3 to 6 weeks to feel like you’re back to normal. PPH is also called a stapled hemorrhoidectomy. The doctor will use a stapler-like device to reposition the hemorrhoids and cut off their blood supply. Without blood, they’ll eventually shrivel and die.

It can treat hemorrhoids that have and have not prolapsed, or slipped down out of the anus. This procedure moves the hemorrhoid to where there are fewer nerve endings, so it hurts less than a traditional hemorrhoidectomy. You’ll also recover faster and have less bleeding and itching. And there are generally fewer complications. Stool softeners can make it easier to poop. Risks It’s very common and is considered safe.

You might have some trouble peeing afterward because of swelling or muscle spasms. If your anal sphincter gets damaged during surgery, you could have accidental bowel or gas leaks, a condition called fecal incontinence. University of Michigan Health System: “Hemorrhoidectomy for Hemorrhoids. Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Hemorrhoids? Diverticulitis Diet Best and worst foods. How to Live Gluten-Free Learn what foods to avoid. Dietary Fiber Will it help constipation? WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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